CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
Plant-based imitation of meat products: How informed is the consumer?
 
More details
Hide details
1
Laboratory of Animal Husbandry, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece
 
 
Publication date: 2022-05-27
 
 
Public Health Toxicol 2022;2(Supplement 1):A29
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Fossil evidence suggest that animal meat and marrow were incorporated in human diet in early stone age. This was a major evolutionary step because meat and marrow are rich in energy yield, essential amino acids and micronutrients. Such dietary change supported the transformation of body size in ancestral lineage, which gave rise to modern humans. Lately, we notice a growing trend accompanied with considerable investments in plant-based foods imitating meat and meat products. It is a major challenge for animal production worldwide. Our intention here is to ensure that consumers are well informed about the processing of plant-based products and that their labelling and marketing practices are transparent. We review the available literature to assess objectively the profile of these plant-based meat alternatives and focus on consumers studies to assess how much informed they are since this change in the diet could become another evolutionary change with unknown consequences. The literature reveals promising scenarios regarding plant-based pilot products in the market, but without verifiable evidence regarding environmental consequences of large-scale production. We conclude that there is scarce evidence of health implications for consumers. The whole issue should be viewed in the broader context of global farming communities and their sustainability.
 
REFERENCES (4)
1.
Milton K. A hypothesis to explain the role of meat-eating in human evolution. Evol Anthropol. 1999;8(1):11-21. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1520-6505(1999)8:1<11::AID-EVAN6>3.0.CO;2-M
 
2.
Neufingerl N, Eilander A. Nutrient Intake and Status in Adults Consuming Plant-Based Diets Compared to Meat-Eaters: A Systematic Review. Nutrients. 2021;14(1):29. doi:10.3390/nu14010029
 
3.
Singh M, Trivedi N, Enamala MK, et al. Plant‑based meat analogue (PBMA) as a sustainable food: a concise review. Eur Food Res Technol. 2021;247(10):2499-2526. doi:10.1007/s00217-021-03810-1
 
4.
Garcez de Oliveira Padilha L, Malek L, Umberger WJ. Consumers’ attitudes towards lab-grown meat, conventionally raised meat and plant-based protein alternatives. Food Qual Prefer. 2022;99:104573. doi:10.1016/j.foodqual.2022.104573
 
ISSN:2732-8929
Journals System - logo
Scroll to top